Located at the archaeological site of Dzibilchaltún, El Museo del Pueblo Maya (museum of the Maya people) was built with the purpose of letting people know about the development of the Maya culture, covering such topics as architecture, housing, visual arts, diet, mathematics, astronomy, and dress, among other things, from the Prehispanic era until today.

After purchasing your ticket, go up the stairs of the tourist booth and turn left, where you will find a sandy path which will take you to the museum (at the fork, turn right).

This museum was adapted to the ecological as well as architectural context of the site, and maintains a close relationship with the nearby Maya community, which actively participates during festive times of the year including Hanal Pixan (Day of the Dead) and Christmas, creating displays in the open spaces.

At this museum you can see approximately 700 archaeological and historical pieces, including the offering to the dead (the seven dolls) and the burial of Kalom ‘Uk’uw Chan Chaak: the last governor of Ch’iy Chan Ti’ Ho’, the name which the city of Mérida was known by in prehispanic times.

The museum has four permanent display rooms:

The Pérgola de los Monolitos (monolith pergola) is an open air garden which forms a path, where prehispanic sculptures are exhibited of the monoliths of Yucatán, Campeche, and Quintana Roo. Here you can see colossal stone figures which were of enormous importance in the Maya culture, such as Chac Mool, for example.

The Sala de Arqueología Maya (Maya archaeology salon) is dedicated to the prehispanic era. Here you can see examples of architecture and ceramics from Yucatán, Campeche, and Chiapas, arranged in a way that illustrates various themes, including the Maya cosmovision (vision of the world and universe according to the Maya), the arrival of mankind, the relationship between humans and nature, social stratification, the gods, painting and writing, how time was counted, and work specializations.

In the Sala Histórica (historical salon) there is a space specifically dedicated to the archaeology of Dzibilchaltún, the contact and conquest of the Maya people, and the formation of the Yucatecan identity. Here you can admire coats of arms, Spanish attire and swords, as well as carved bones, bells, and a figure of a jaguar, rescued from the Xlakáh cenote, found in the archaeological site.

The Solar Maya (Maya open space) is an annex where a typical Maya rural home was built, using traditional materials, techniques, and labor.

We recommend that you take a bottle of water with you (food is not permitted), comfortable shoes and clothing, sunblock, and insect repellant. Don’t forget your bathing suit and towel, so you can swim in the cenote! Video photography is not permitted.

Museum open Tuesday-Sunday 8 am – 3.30 pm.

Entry to the site includes the museum: $94 pesos Mexican nationals, $122 pesos foreigners, includes museum entry. Mexican teachers and students: $35 pesos. On Sunday Mexican nationals are free of charge.

 

Located at the archaeological site of Dzibilchaltún, El Museo del Pueblo Maya (museum of the Maya people) was built with the purpose of letting people know about the development of the Maya culture.

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