Sensational tourism destinations exist all around the world. It’s a given that for many people, Yucatán is one of them. That’s why today I want to tell you about a new way to travel and discover the customs and traditions of our Maya towns.

Co’ox Mayab is a union made up of 13 cooperatives from around the state with the mission of promoting tourism in rural communities. They serve as an intermediary between each co-op and the visitors that look to delve deeper into Yucatán’s soul.

With time, the project has grown into the largest tour operator that promotes alternative tourism (whose practices are environmentally and socially conscious) in Yucatán.

Tours take place all over the state. You’ll have a chance to visit towns such as Tekit, San Agustín, and Tzucacab (in the south of Yucatán), or Sinanché, San Crisanto, and San Felipe (close to the coast). The minimum number of participants for a tour is four people. But if you prefer, you can also ask for personalized services.

At each town, you’ll be involved in some of the activities that are part of local daily life and understand what it’s like for the inhabitants of these rural areas. Visits to the milpa, beekeeping, swimming in cenotes, birdwatching, tours of the mangroves, baking, candle workshops, and more are bits of Yucatán you’ll be able to experience first-hand.

Whether you wish to spend the day or extend your trip, the Co’ox Mayab team will organize a route that fits you. At most sites, you can spend the night in camping areas, while others have cabins you can stay at.

Co’ox Mayab is the ideal intermediary for visitors looking to discover the reality of our state and rich Maya culture. The Maya don’t only have a strong legacy that is present in our archeological sites, they have also left their mark in the customs and traditions that have been kept alive in the rural zones of Yucatán. Venture out and don’t miss the opportunity to discover our Yucatecan roots!

Calle 76 x 41 y 43, Centro
Tel. (999) 447 8395
www.cooxmayab.com
FB: Co’ox Mayab

Editorial by Claudia Améndola
Photography by Co’ox Mayab for its use in Yucatán Today

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